Murder Falcon #3 - "I can feel the shred powering me!"

Murder Falcon #3 - "I can feel the shred powering me!"

Credit: Daniel Warren Johnson, Mike Spicer, and Rus Wooton

Credit: Daniel Warren Johnson, Mike Spicer, and Rus Wooton

Daniel Warren Johnson’s Murder Falcon deserves all the praise it can get.  What makes it so great, and this month’s entry the strongest yet, is neither the murder (of the disharmonious Veldar) nor the Falcon (an otherworldly avatar empowered by electric guitar), but the way music brings broken people together.

This issue takes us further into the loss of front-man Jake’s wife, powerfully illustrated by the enveloping darkness and diminishing text at the news of her cancer. It’s a perfect example of the right words, the right art, and how the medium of comics is just plain right. 

The drama in this particular issue centers around the break-up of Jake’s band and the struggles of his former drummer, Jimi.  I was expecting to be genuinely moved by Jake’s story of loss and reconciliation.  I was not expecting to care just as much for Jimi by the end of #3.

Credit: Daniel Warren Johnson, Mike Spicer, and Rus Wooton

Credit: Daniel Warren Johnson, Mike Spicer, and Rus Wooton

So yeah, I got a bit misty-eyed at a few points, but I was also grinning ear to ear by the time I turned the page. Murf’s 80’s action-movie poses and dialogue (“rescuing you—with DISTORTION,” “Eat Metal!”) along with the reactions of bystanders (“is that a mastodon?”) and the general accepted craziness of it all (“There were goblins.  It has jetpacks.”) just plain rock. 

From the synergy of art and story to the character development to the sheer insanity of it all, I don’t think it gets any better than Murder Falcon, and somehow, #3 manages to top #2.  I’m off to re-read it again.  In the words of Murf, “I can feel the shred empowering me!”

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