Lucy Dreaming #1: Snappy, hilarious, and fantastic

Lucy Dreaming #1: Snappy, hilarious, and fantastic

This Wednesday, Boom! Studios will release the first installment in a new miniseries called Lucy Dreaming. The story of a misfit teenager who finds her dreams made real, Max Bemis’s tale might be the funniest thing I’ve read in a few years. Brought to whimsical life by artist Michael Dialynas and letterer Colin Bell, Lucy Dreaming #1 left me craving more, and I can’t wait until the next issue gives it to me in April.

Hilariously relevant

It should come as no surprise that title-character Lucy would possess the ability to enter her dreams in a full state of consciousness, because she has a very active thought-life to begin with. Bemis gives us a look at quite a bit of it, and it’s all just so darn funny. After an introductory scene at the table with her folks, Lucy's narration kicks in, as she addresses her “fake blog [she] will never publish online because [she] judge[s] bloggers but [is] also too pretentious to call a ‘diary’”. Who hasn’t meant someone like this in the past five years? I can think of a number of people that sound just like this. 

Beneath the humor, there’s some real feelings and astute observations, as well. Lucy’s characterization contains a number of stereotypes, but Bemis doesn’t simply point out the ridiculousness of such attitudes and move on. That there is more to Lucy implies that there is more to the folks at whom we are quick to snicker, too. 

As entertaining as Lucy’s real world is, her dream world is where this book really comes alive. The characters there are—understandably—more colorful, and I don’t think I stopped laughing until I stopped reading. It certainly helps that Dialynas knocks it out of the park with his illustration. The artwork is very playful in the first portion of the book, and while it remains light throughout, the dream sequence features fewer facial exaggerations and other flourishes. It still feels appropriate for the overall tone of the book, but it’s contextualized in a way that I find helpful.

Bell is likewise very playful with his lettering. The sound effects appear to be hand-drawn, and they look great. They sit very nicely amidst the artwork, almost as though they were styled and laid out by Dialynas instead. The dialogue reads very nicely, and while I’m not sure it’s necessary to have so much variation (standard all-caps for most characters, sentence case for Lucy, different fonts for certain characters), I never feel distracted by that variation, either.

Everything you’ve been dreaming of

All-in-all, Lucy Dreaming is an excellent-crafted, highly-humorous adventure worth multiple reads. My only real criticism is that the series will be limited to five installments—and if that’s the worst I can say, then I’d say I can’t say there’s much bad to say about this book—wouldn’t you say? Pick up your copy of the first issue this Wednesday—you’ll be glad you did. 

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