Justice League #24: Superman v Batman at the twilight of the multiverse

Justice League #24: Superman v Batman at the twilight of the multiverse

I review Justice League over at Batman News, and when Scott Snyder and Jorge Jimenez are on the book, it’s an absolute joy to review. They’re currently nearing the end of an arc called “The Sixth Dimension,” and here’s the tldr;: the World Forger—a cosmic being responsible for the makeup of reality—claims that Superman’s idealism will be the undoing of everything, and that Batman will have to make the tough decisions to ensure the preservation of life in the multiverse. It seems like Bats is falling for it—though most of us who read the book think he’s faking—and issue #24 paints a stark picture of the difference between the morality of Superman and the morality of Batman:

The conflict at the center of this arc is one of idealism vs. pragmatism. It’s the classic moral question: what makes an action morally right? Is morality external to circumstance, or does circumstance shape morality?

...

On the one side, you have Superman, a hero who keeps finding ways to do the impossible rather than compromise his principles. He may doubt his decision-making at times, but his eyes are fixed on notions of right and wrong instilled in him by his father over the years. He does not consider laying those notions aside.

On the other side, we have Batman, who looks at the (evidently) disastrous outcome of Superman’s idealism and decides that a principle that fails to produce the desired outcome is a principle worth discarding—or at least suspending for a necessary period of time.
— https://batman-news.com/2019/05/15/justice-league-24-review-2/

And it’s not as though Clark clings to his principles because of abstract notions of right and wrong alone:

Superman believes that violating his principles can not save the world—that the world is in far greater danger when its protector is an authoritarian.
— https://batman-news.com/2019/05/15/justice-league-24-review-2/

So he does the right thing because it’s right, but he also believes (rightly, I think) that compromising principles does not actually earn the intended benefits.

It’s a classic philosophical question, and one that I think Snyder handles well here. You can read the whole review at Batman News, and let us know what you thought of the book below in the comments!

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